Search found 44 results.

Icon

Programmer's Library is a comprehensive collection of the most useful reference information available for programmers in MS-DOS and OS/2 environments. With Programmer's Library you can instantly get authoritative information about programming from books, manuals, and sample code in the following categories: Microsoft OS/2 References, Microsoft Windows References, MS-DOS References, Microsoft Network References, Microsoft Systems Journal, Hardware References, Microsoft C Language References, Microsoft Macro Assembler References, Microsoft BASIC Language References, Microsoft Pascal Language References, Microsoft FORTRAN Language References valuable programs, data, and sample code files 1991 for DOS](/product/bookshelf/91).


Icon

Microsoft Project is a project management chart and gantt chart generator. It is a Microsoft Office family member, and built on the Office code, although it has never shipped with any Office suite.


Icon

Microsoft Source Profiler is an application speed analysis tool for use with Microsoft language products. Version 1.x supports both DOS and OS/2.


Icon

Microsoft Space Simulator is a space flight simulator program for MS-DOS. It was one of the first general-purpose space flight simulators and it incorporated concepts from astrodynamics and celestial mechanics.


Icon

Microsoft Spell is a spell checking application intended for use with Microsoft Word 1.x for DOS. You can also use it as a standalone program. Microsoft Spell 1.0 was available for purchase by itself, but later versions were bundled with Microsoft Word for DOS.


Icon

First released in 1991, Microsoft Visual Basic was a programming environment where one could build an application by visually creating the user interface first, and then adding code. In contrast, even the smallest Visual Basic basic programs could take reams of program code to write in C or C++. Visual Basic was extremely popular for business application programming. The language itself was an interpreted BASIC dialect, however speed was maintained through the use of reusable compiled libraries (DLLs and VBX controls). These however, limited application development to Microsoft Windows.


Icon

These disks are original boot floppy disk media for use with Microsoft Windows CD-ROMs. Not all Windows 9x/ME CDs are bootable, not all CDs included boot disks, and DOS will not see a CD-ROM drive unless a driver is loaded. OEMs were expected to provide compatible CD-ROM with the boot media provided with their systems. However towards the very late 90s, most vendors standardized on IDE/ATAPI CD-ROM hardware and the use of the OEM Adaption Kit (OAK) driver. If your CD drive is not IDE compatible (such as an MKE or Panasonic interface) you must manually add your own driver. Note: you can use the Windows 98 boot disk with Windows 95 to make things easier. If you have any UNTOUCHED OEM boot disks with different drivers, please submit them.


Icon

The Microsoft Word word processor was first introduced for MS-DOS in 1983. Its design made use of a mouse and WYSIWYG graphics. Its crude WYSIWYG/mouse support was a direct response to the Apple Lisa/Mac, and VisiCorp Visi On. Initially it competed against many popular word processors such as WordStar, Multimate, and WordPerfect. Word for DOS was never really successful.


Icon

Microsoft Works was an all-in-one scaled-down Word Processor, Spreadsheet, and Database geared towards the home user. It was released in variants for early DOS, Windows, and Macintosh. Microsoft Works competed against Lotus Jazz, FrameWork, AlphaWorks/LotusWorks, PFS First Choice, and many others.


Icon

MSCDEX is the real-mode MS-DOS driver for accessing CD drives.


Icon

Originally 86-DOS, written by Tim Paterson of Seattle Computer Products, DOS was a rough clone of CP/M for 8086 based hardware. Microsoft purchased it and licensed it to IBM for use with Microsoft's IBM PC language products. In 1982, Microsoft began licensing DOS to other OEMs that ported it to their custom x86 hardware and IBM PC clones.


Icon

Microsoft Multiplan was an early 8-bit spreadsheet application for CP/M and MS-DOS with ports to numerous other platforms in the early 80s. Initially it competed against VisiCalc and later Lotus 1-2-3. A companion product, Microsoft Chart, provided graphing support. Multiplan was never ported to Windows, where it was replaced with Microsoft Excel. Excel also replaced Multiplan on the Macintosh platform.


Icon

Multitasking "MS-DOS 4.00" is the once hyped future of DOS, that Microsoft shelved in favor of OS/2 and IBM's regular DOS 4.0x.


Icon

Microsoft QBasic, not to be confused with QuickBasic, is a stripped down version of the Microsoft QuickBasic product that replaces GW-Basic in MS-DOS 5.0 and later. QBasic is an interpreter only, and can not compile standalone executables. QuickBasic sources can be compiled into binary EXE files with QuickBasic or Visual Basic for DOS.


Icon

Microsoft QuickBasic, not to be confused with the lesser QBasic, was a Basic interpreter and compiler product loosely based on GW-Basic. Version 2.0 for DOS and later included an Integrated Development Environment. Microsoft also produced QuickPascal and QuickC with similar integrated environments. Professional Development System](/product/microsoft-basic), and competed against language products targeted at hobbyists, such as those from Borland.


Icon

Microsoft QuickC is a C compiler with an Integrated Development Environment, designed to compete with Borland Turbo C. It was targeted at home/hobbyist users with a much lower price tag than Microsoft's corporate-oriented professional products. Microsoft also produced QuickPascal and QuickBasic with similar integrated environments.


Icon

Microsoft QuickPascal was a short-lived dialect of Pascal created specifically to compete with Borland Turbo Pascal. It incorporated many Borland-specific features at the expense of backwards compatiblity with the earlier Microsoft Pascal product.


Icon

The Windows SDK and DDK gives you the libraries and headers needed to do software and driver development for Windows.


Icon

The Microsoft Workgroup Add-On for MS-DOS is the easy way to connect users of MS-DOS to networks based on Microsoft windows. Now you can share documents, messages, and printers among PCs running MS-DOS and connect to Windows-based PCs too. It could be just what you need to make the most of older PCs and start networking.