Search found 13 results.

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Harvard Graphics, from Software Publishing Corporation and initially called Harvard Presentation Graphics, is a graphing/plotting/presentation creation application for DOS. It was extremely popular in the late 1980s. At release, it competed against many graphing products such as PFS:Graph (AKA IBM Graphing Assistant ), Microsoft Chart, ChartMaster, and Cricket Graph, just to name a small few. A Windows port was released in 1991, but it lost out to Microsoft Powerpoint.


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OfficeWriter, from Office Solutions, Inc and later Software Publishing Corporation, is a word processor that mimics the Wang word processor system. It was targeted at corporations and competed against Multimate, another Wang word processor workalike.


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PFS Access is an easy to use, but rather basic, telecommunications program designed to fit in with the low cost PFS series products. It lacks many features found in more professional products.


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PFS First Choice is a simple, easy to use integrated office suite marketed towards new users. It includes a word processor, spreadsheet, graphics, database, and telecommunications. First Choice is similar to, but not as feature rich as, the standalone PFS office products. It competed against AlphaWorks/LotusWorks and Microsoft Works.


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First Publisher, from Software Publishing Corporation, is a WYSIWYG desktop publisher for DOS that excels at producing extremely high quality text and graphics print even using dot-matrix printers. This program originated as T/Maker Clickart. In 1991 Software Publishing Corp sold their PFS series to Spinnaker Software, where it became Easy Working Desktop Publisher.


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PFS Preface is a menu system and file manager for DOS that uses an interface style similar to other PFS products.


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PFS Professional File is an easy to use flat-file database for DOS. It is a combination of the earlier PFS:File and PFS:Report products.


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PFS:File is an easy to use flat file database that started off as "PFS: The Personal Filing System" on the Apple II and then ported to the IBM PC, TRS-80, and other platforms. OEM version were available from various companies including IBM. Later it evolved in to PFS:Professional File, and IBM rebranded a version as IBM Filing Assistant.


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PFS:Graph, from Software Publishing Corporation, is an easy to use graphing application for early IBM PC compatibles, Apple IIs, Apple IIIs, and Macintosh. Later it evolved in to PFS:First Graphics, and IBM rebranded a version as IBM Graphing Assistant.


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PFS:Report is a companion product to PFS:File. It prepares and prints tabular reports, according to your specifications, from the information stored in a PFS file. IBM rebranded a version as IBM Reporting Assistant. The functionality of this product was later integrated in to PFS:Professional File


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PFS:Write, originally from Software Publishing Corporation and later sold to Spinnaker Software, was an early and easy to use word processor for the IBM PC and Apple II. It was also licensed by IBM as IBM Writing Assistant. It can exchange data between PFS:Graph, PFS:File, and PFS:Report. SPC later replaced PFS:Write with Professional Write. Early versions had no built in spell checker, and were instead used with PFS:Proof.


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Professional Write, from Software Publishing Corporation, was a popular word processor for home use during the late 80s and early 90s. It features an easy to use menu system and an integrated spell checker. Professional Write was a revamp and replacement for SPC's earlier PFS:Write.


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Superbase is an easy to use database program that featured "VCR" like controls for moving between fields. It originated on the Commodore 64, and had ports to Apple II, Amiga, Atari, GEM, and Windows. It was created by Precision Software, sold to SPC, then branched off to Superbase Inc. flavors. A lower cost version that lacked the ability to create or run applications, called "Superbase 2 Windows", and the full blown product called "Superbase 4 Windows". for Microsoft Windows. The first Windows versions ran under Windows 2. detailed history can be found on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superbase_%28database%29