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Microsoft LAN Manager is a networking system for OS/2 similar to their earlier MS-NET product. Licensed variants of this product include 3Com 3+Open, HP LAN Manager/X, IBM LAN Server, and Tapestry Torus.


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Although Microsoft did not invent BASIC, their founding product was a BASIC interpreter for the Altair computer. The descendants below includes Microsoft's BASIC-80 (MBASIC), BASIC-86 (pre-GWBasic), BASIC for Mac, BASIC Compiler 86/88, Basic Compiler for Mac, and Professional Development System 7.x. IBM Personal Computer Basic Compiler, GW-BASIC, QuickBasic, and Visual Basic are listed separately.


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This is the original standalone Microsoft C/C++ compiler for DOS and Windows - Later versions were rebranded and renumbered as Microsoft Visual C++ and were bundled with Visual Studio or the SDKs.


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Excel, from Microsoft, is a powerful spreadsheet application for Mac, Windows, and OS/2. Excel was first released for the Mac. When it was ported to Windows 2.x, they started at version "2.0" to one up current Mac version. There was never a DOS version. Instead, DOS and 8-bit platforms used the older Microsoft Multiplan. Excel was later bundled as part of Microsoft Office


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These are drivers provided by Microsoft for the Microsoft BusPort, serial, and PS/2 mice. Introduced in 1983, The Microsoft Mouse is historically important as it was one of Microsoft's earliest hardware products (The other being an Apple II Z-80 CP/M card). The first Mouse for the IBM PC was actually from Mouse Systems, not Microsoft. However, most clone mice emulated Microsoft's serial protocol and DOS driver software interface. The first application designed to make full use of the mouse was Microsoft Word for DOS, and they hyped a product called "Microsoft Windows" (not released until several years later) that was to compete against the upcoming Apple Macintosh and the Mouse Systems based Viscorp Visi On.


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The Microsoft OS/2 Programmer's Toolkit 1.0 contains advanced OS/2 1.0 API sample code and documentation for use in conjunction with Microsoft's high-level programming products, sold separately. Software Development Kit, which bundled programming language support and pre-release components.


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The Microsoft OS/2 SDK includes pre-release builds of OS/2, beta development tools, sample code, and loads of documentation. These were released prior to the OS/2 1.0 and 1.1 releases. Microsoft charged $3,000 in 1987 for the SDK. It was criticized as overpriced, buggy, and slow.


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The Microsoft Pascal Compiler is Microsoft's implementation of the ISO Pascal language for DOS, Xenix, and OS/2. It was among Microsoft's early language products provided for DOS. It was superseded by Microsoft QuickPascal. The Microsoft Pascal Compiler was licensed to IBM, who sold it as the IBM Pascal Compiler.


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Microsoft Source Profiler is an application speed analysis tool for use with Microsoft language products. Version 1.x supports both DOS and OS/2.


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A database server from Microsoft. It was originally based on Sybase SQL Server, and the first versions were for OS/2. It was available as a standalone product and also as a part of Microsoft BackOffice Server.


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The Microsoft Word word processor was first introduced for MS-DOS in 1983. Its design made use of a mouse and WYSIWYG graphics. Its crude WYSIWYG/mouse support was a direct response to the Apple Lisa/Mac, and VisiCorp Visi On. Initially it competed against many popular word processors such as WordStar, Multimate, and WordPerfect. Word for DOS was never really successful.


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Microsoft Multiplan was an early 8-bit spreadsheet application for CP/M and MS-DOS with ports to numerous other platforms in the early 80s. Initially it competed against VisiCalc and later Lotus 1-2-3. A companion product, Microsoft Chart, provided graphing support. Multiplan was never ported to Windows, where it was replaced with Microsoft Excel. Excel also replaced Multiplan on the Macintosh platform.