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A reference tool from Microsoft, including a dictionary, thesaurus, quotations, atlas, and other types of references. Some versions were included and integrated with Microsoft Office, albeit sometimes stripped down.


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CodeView was a standalone debugger created by David Norris at Microsoft in 1985 as part of its development toolset. It originally shipped with Microsoft C 4.0 and later. It also shipped with Visual Basic for MS-DOS, Microsoft Basic PDS, and a number of other Microsoft language products. It was one of the first debuggers on the MS-DOS platform that was full-screen oriented.


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Microsoft FORTRAN Powerstation was a rebranding of Microsoft's earlier Microsoft Fortran product. It featured support for 32-bit DOS and Microsoft Windows.


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FoxPro, originally from Fox Software and later Microsoft, is a relational database that clones the functionality of dBase IV, but offers vast speed improvements. It was based on Fox Software's FoxBASE (a dBASE II clone) and FoxBASE+ (a dBase III Plus clone). It adds a new mac-like user interface that was first developed for FoxBASE+/Mac.


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GW-BASIC is a version of BASIC that was supplied with MS-DOS and as a replacement for IBM ROM basic. GW-BASIC replaced the earlier BASIC-86 supplied with some non-IBM OEM MS-DOS 1.x and 2.x. MS-DOS 5.0 and later replaced GW-BASIC with QBasic , a stripped down version of QuickBasic.


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IntelliPoint is a set of mouse driver software for Microsoft's IntelliMouse series mice. This software is redistributable but posted here for convenience.


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First released in 1985, the Microsoft Access Business Information Access Program is a telecommunications program that features VT100, VT52 and TTY terminal emulation, macros, a powerful scripting language, self-learning scripts, data import/export facilities, multiple windowed sessions, and built in support for a variety of on-line services. It competed with Procomm, Crosstalk, Relay Gold, and PC-Talk.


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Although Microsoft did not invent BASIC, their founding product was a BASIC interpreter for the Altair computer. The descendants below includes Microsoft's BASIC-80 (MBASIC), BASIC-86 (pre-GWBasic), BASIC for Mac, BASIC Compiler 86/88, Basic Compiler for Mac, and Professional Development System 7.x. IBM Personal Computer Basic Compiler, GW-BASIC, QuickBasic, and Visual Basic are listed separately.


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This is the original standalone Microsoft C/C++ compiler for DOS and Windows - Later versions were rebranded and renumbered as Microsoft Visual C++ and were bundled with Visual Studio or the SDKs.


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Microsoft Chart is a presentation graphics tool. You can use it to create line, bar, pie charts and more. It competed against titles such as PFS Graph, Chart Master, DR Graph, Harvard Presentation Graphics, and BPS Business Graphics. It was sometimes sold as a companion product to Multiplan. Microsoft later included charting functionality in Excel and PowerPoint.


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Cobol is a high level language designed for use in business that uses English-like commands. Microsoft got its early start by producing language products such as this one. Their other early language products included Microsoft Fortran, Microsoft Pascal, Microsoft Basic, and Macro Assembler. This product was also licensed to IBM as IBM Cobol Compiler.


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Microsoft Diagnostics is a DOS-based diagnostic troubleshooting tool


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Excel, from Microsoft, is a powerful spreadsheet application for Mac, Windows, and OS/2. Excel was first released for the Mac. When it was ported to Windows 2.x, they started at version "2.0" to one up current Mac version. There was never a DOS version. Instead, DOS and 8-bit platforms used the older Microsoft Multiplan. Excel was later bundled as part of Microsoft Office


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Flight Simulator is simulation "game" in which you pilot an airplane around the world. It started off as subLOGIC Flight Simulator on the Apple II, but was OEMed by Microsoft for the IBM PC. It was very popular, and one of few early games to provide a "3d" experience.


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This is Microsoft's implementation of the FORTRAN scientific-oriented high level programming language. It was one of their early core languages developed for the 8-bit computers and later brought to the 8086 and IBM PC. For the IBM OEM version, see the IBM Fortran Compiler. In 1993 Microsoft rebranded the product as Microsoft Fortran Powerstation. (Note: -80 refers to the 8080/Z80 platform, not the language specification version)


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Microsoft Game Shop is a development tool for creating games in QuickBASIC. Microsoft Game Shop includes a full-featured version of Microsoft's QuickBASIC 4.5 interpreter plus six classic computer games, including a version of Tetris that you can both play and modify using QuickBASIC.


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Nothing is more frustrating than getting a new PC and not knowing how to use it. It's equally frustrating when inexperience with the finer points of DOS keeps you from being more productive. Microsoft Learning DOS is the complete DOS learning system - everything you need to start out right and to master DOS.


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The Microsoft Macro Assembler (MASM) is an x86 assembler that uses the Intel syntax for MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows. For a time, it competed with Borland Turbo Assembler. IBM re-branded early versions under the name IBM Macro Assembler. Later versions were bundled with Microsoft Visual Studio.


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There were two distinct "Microsoft Mail" products. One for AppleTalk Networks, and one for PC Networks.


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These are drivers provided by Microsoft for the Microsoft BusPort, serial, and PS/2 mice. Introduced in 1983, The Microsoft Mouse is historically important as it was one of Microsoft's earliest hardware products (The other being an Apple II Z-80 CP/M card). The first Mouse for the IBM PC was actually from Mouse Systems, not Microsoft. However, most clone mice emulated Microsoft's serial protocol and DOS driver software interface. The first application designed to make full use of the mouse was Microsoft Word for DOS, and they hyped a product called "Microsoft Windows" (not released until several years later) that was to compete against the upcoming Apple Macintosh and the Mouse Systems based Viscorp Visi On.


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MS-DOS Manager is a friendly file manager shell provided through OEMs for use with MS-DOS 3.x. It was bundled with systems from Zenith, 3COM, and others. It is similar in operation to the Windows 1.x and 2.x MS-DOS Executive. single or split screen file list (but no drag-and-drop), files may be viewed with details or as a compact list, supports associating file type with external applications, and programs installed on your computer are easily added to an "Applications" dropdown menu.


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This is a set of development tools used to create network drivers for DOS and OS/2.


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The Microsoft OS/2 SDK includes pre-release builds of OS/2, beta development tools, sample code, and loads of documentation. These were released prior to the OS/2 1.0 and 1.1 releases. Microsoft charged $3,000 in 1987 for the SDK. It was criticized as overpriced, buggy, and slow.


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The Microsoft Pascal Compiler is Microsoft's implementation of the ISO Pascal language for DOS, Xenix, and OS/2. It was among Microsoft's early language products provided for DOS. It was superseded by Microsoft QuickPascal. The Microsoft Pascal Compiler was licensed to IBM, who sold it as the IBM Pascal Compiler.


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Microsoft Profit was a business accounting system intended to compete against Intuit, Peachtree, and similar products. It was originally created by Great Plains Software for Microsoft. Only the one version was released.