Search found 114 results.

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Internet Explorer is Microsoft's venture into the Web Browser market. The initial version of Explorer was incarnated from Spyglass Mosaic which Microsoft licensed for a modest quarterly fee and a share of the non-Windows product revenues. As Microsoft decided to distribute Internet Explorer "free of charge" with their Windows operating system, they were able to avoid most royalties. This resulted in a lawsuit and a US$8 million settlement in January 1997. Being included in Windows since Windows 95 and beyond, it quickly overtook Netscape in the first Browser War and retained ~95% of market share until the early 2000's when popular alternative browsers such as Mozilla Firefox came to market sparking the 2nd browser war. Internet Explorer was long known for disobeying set web standards by the W3C until version 9 when Microsoft took a new commitment to HTML5 and web standards.


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FormFlow is a comprehensive business form and workflow automation tool. It is designed to interface with many different kinds of databases and many different e-mail, network, and fax sources. The "Filler" is essentially just the client runtime and does not include form creation or management abilities.


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Key HomeInventory is a budget title targeted at home users. It consists of a simple database specifically for inventorying items in ones home.


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KeyMailer is a professional and easy to use mailing list managment program.


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Logictree, From CAM Software, is an easy to use Expert System program that makes decisions based on a programmed "tree" of information.


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Lotus Approach, originally from Approach Software Corporation, is a relational database management system. Approach promises "instant productivity" with its WYSIWYG form and report designer, and is compatible with many existing database formats. Approach started off as an independent product, was purchased by Lotus, and later IBM. It was included in Lotus SmartSuite for Microsoft Windows.


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Lotus Forms is an electronic form creation tool for Microsoft Windows. Lotus Forms uses a Designer to create forms and a Filler client program to fill out forms. electronically through Lotus Notes, cc:Mail, and Microsoft Mail. It supports arbitrary pen-like markup, and can interface with databases. At the release of 1.0 the filler client only supported Windows.


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Lotus Jazz was a heavily marketed all-in-one integrated office suite that included a word processor, spreadsheet, graphing, database, and communications program. Jazz was targeted as a universal solution for all office workers. Although at release, the program was exclusively for the Apple Macintosh 512k. Despite the marketing effort, it flopped miserably. Although it was from Lotus, the spreadsheet was not related to Lotus 1-2-3. Microsoft Works.


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IBM/Lotus SmartSuite is an office suite from Lotus software for Windows and OS/2. SmartSuite includes SmartCenter, 1-2-3, Word Pro, Freelance Graphics, Approach, Organizer, and ScreenCam.


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Lotus Symphony is a an integrated software program that combines five tools: spreadsheet - word processing, graphics, database management, and data communications - in one package. The spreadsheet has similar functionality to Lotus 1-2-3, however it uses a different software "engine". These releases are of the original suite produced by Lotus. For the unrelated suite produced by IBM under the same name, see "IBM Lotus Symphony".


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Formerly Electric Desk/AlphaWorks from Alpha Software, Lotus Works is an all in one office suite for DOS that includes a word processor, spell check, spreadsheet, graphics, database, and communications. It targeted the lower end and first time computer buyers. It competed against other all in one office suites such as FrameWork, PFS First Choice, and Microsoft Works


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MapLinx for Windows is a geographic database utility that lets business professionals SEE what they're doing by automatically converting database records with zip code fields to symbols on a U.S. map.


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MicroPro DataStar is a general purpose forms based desktop database for early IBM PCs and compatibles. It is often used in conjunction with ReportStar and sometimes bundled as InfoStar. MicroPro products were commonly bundled with OEM systems.


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MicroPro ReportStar is a report generator for DOS used in conjunction with DataStar and sometimes bundled as InfoStar.


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Microsoft Access is a powerful and friendly desktop database. You can design complex tables, forms, and reports through selection and drag-and drop. You can make a fully usable interactive database application without a line of code, but for more advanced functionality it supports built-in Visual Basic for Applications. It is also bundled with some versions of Microsoft Office


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Exchange is a proprietary e-mail and groupware server software from Microsoft for Windows Server. The first version publicly sold was Exchange Server 4.0. The number 4.0 was used as it was a replacement for Microsoft Mail 3.x. At release, unlike other desktop/lan e-mail solutions it featured client/server communications rather than using file sharing, used a powerful messaging protocol, and stored all message and address book information in a database. It eventually evolved to include scheduling and many other functions. The Exchange Client (later Microsoft Outlook) supported rich text formatting, and the ability to create such things as e-mail forms.


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Microsoft file is an easy to use (non relational) database program for the Apple Macintosh. You can build custom databases with text, numeric, and pictorial fields. You can then enter or view data through GUI based forms and reports. Microsoft File features a visual form and reports builder that enables you to quickly build a customized database user interface. only sold in Japan. (Source: InfoWorld Jan 21, 1985)


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Microsoft Office is a bundle of Microsoft's productivity application. This includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access and later Mail, Office Manager, and Outlook. The "1.x" versions of Microsoft Office were simply a marketing bundle of the standalone products sold together with no other packaging changes. Even though these were distinct applications, rather than one single monolithic program, they shared a similar user interface, integrated well together and shared the ability to embed documents from one application in the documents of another.


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Microsoft Works was an all-in-one scaled-down Word Processor, Spreadsheet, and Database geared towards the home user. It was released in variants for early DOS, Windows, and Macintosh. Microsoft Works competed against Lotus Jazz, FrameWork, AlphaWorks/LotusWorks, PFS First Choice, and many others.


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mIRC is an Internet Relay Chat client for 16-bit and 32-bit Windows with it's own unique scripting language.


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An old instant messenger platform from Microsoft since superseded by Skype. The MSN Messenger (Windows Live Messenger) servers have since been shut down from Microsoft, so don't expect this software to work anymore. Software is for historical purposes only.


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My Advanced MailList is a comprehensive mailing list manager database that supports a wide variety of label formats, embedded graphics, import/export with other databases, and printing POST-NET barcodes.


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MyTreasures is a budget database program from My Software that is specifically designed for keeping track of collectibles. It features the ability to sort, print booklets, labels, reports, and Rolodex cards. Perfect for inventorying your baseball cards, coins, or VHS video collection.


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First released in 1993, NCSA Mosaic was the first really popular web browser. Unlike the original browser, WorldWideWeb on NeXT, Mosaic was available for the Microsoft Windows platform and added features such as inline graphics viewing. It was developed by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. NCSA Mosaic was distributed freely for non commercial use, but required a license for commercial business use. It was licensed by a number of third party OEMs, including Microsoft, who used it for the basis of Microsoft Internet Explorer. In 1995, its popularly quickly gave way to Netscape Navigator.