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Textra, from the University of Michigan based Ann Arbor Software, was a small and fast word processor highly optimized for speed and rapid data entry. First released in 1982 Textra, like many other early PC word processors, was born out of the lack of a decent IBM PC editor/word processor. Textra featured a full set of text manipulation commands, common text formatting abilities, and full screen editing. It was specifically designed for the IBM PC, giving it faster load and save times and the most responsive user interface possible. It was priced much lower than most other text editors or word processors.


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The Benchmark was an early, and somewhat short lived, word processor. This version is for the NEC APC running CP/M-86.


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Steinman is a small spreadsheet program originally written in 1984 for the Commodore 64 by Barbara Steinman. The Steinman Spreadsheet is "output oriented", focusing on creating customized printed reports based on your spreadsheet data. distributed by SoftDisk with their Big Blue Disk magazine.


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"The Twin", from Mosaic Software, is a spreadsheet that touts compatibility and visual similarity with Lotus 1-2-3. better graphics, a much lower price, and was not copy protected. It was a little slower than Lotus 1-2-3, but this was less of an issue for budget users. The Twin, along with Paperback VP-Planner and Borland Quattro Pro were the subject of a lawsuit claiming that duplicating the "look and feel" violated Lotus's copyrights.


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THINK C, originally from THINK Technologies and later Symantec, was a C compiler for the Apple Macintosh. Initially released in 1986 under the name "Lightspeed C", it featured libraries and extensions useful to creating native Macintosh applications. It competed with Macintosh Programmers Workshop.


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TI-Writer was the standard word processor for the TI-99/4A. To use TI-Writer, you must have the TI-Writer cartridge (needed to load the disk software) and a TI-99/4A with the 32k RAM and disk expansion options.


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Timeworks DOS Office, from Timeworks, Inc., is an office suite consisting of the Timeworks Word Writer PC word processor, the Timeworks SwftCalc spreadsheet, and the Timeworks Data Manager desktop database.


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The Borland Turbo Pascal Toolbox consists of several sets of sample source code for different purposes. They are designed for use in conjunction with the Turbo Pascal Compiler product. The sets include Turbo Graphix Toobox, Turbo Database Toolbox, Turbo GameWorks Tooolbox (new in 1986 with TP 3), and Turbo Editor Toolbox (new in 1986 with TP 3). Also see the Turbo Pascal Tutor.


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Ultracalc, from Lattice Inc, is an electronic spreadsheet program that was available for CP/M, DOS, and Unix. It includes an algebraic expression analyzer that supports 11 operators and 22 functions. The system employs a menu-driven format and includes an extensive set of prompts, on-line help and error messages. Ultracalc is written in C and was considered highly portable.


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Valdocs is an office suite that was bundled with the Epson QX-10 (and later QX-16) Z80 based computer. It was "WYSIWYG" in that it could display different fonts of different sizes in the editor on the screen. It could also embed images in the document, and print the document to a graphics printer.


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Varsity Scripsit is a menu driven, easy to use, low cost word processor sold by Tandy/RadioShack and targeted toward academic users. It features footnotes, built in help, split screen, spell checker, automatic hyphenation, table of contents and keyword index generation, user definable macros, reference markers, paragraph locking, line drawing, and phonetic symbols.


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VEDIT, from CompuView, is an extremely powerful, flexible, and customizable editor designed for power users and programmers. It can handle extremely huge files. It has a programmable command mode that can be used to automatically perform complex operations on files. It features a completely customizable keyboard layout and special features for editing programming language source files. operating systems including CP/M-80, CP/M-86, and MS-DOS, and supported a large number of terminal types.


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VisiCalc was the first spreadsheet program for personal computers. It was extremely successful, and pivotal as it was significantly responsible for moving personal computing out of the realm of hobbyists and in to the realm of serious business tools. application suite that also included VisiWord, VisiFile, VisiSpell, VisiTrend/Plot, and VisiTutor. a GUI based environment. But that did not catch on. The similarly named Visi On Calc spreadsheet is not at all related to VisiCalc, and later had to be renamed to Visi On Plan.


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VisiSpell is a standalone spell checker for DOS, that is intended for use with VisiCorp VisiWord but can be used with any text document.


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VisiWord is a solid and well designed word processor for the IBM PC from VisiCorp. It was part of VisiCorp's integrated office application suite that also included VisiCalc, VisiFile, VisiSpell, VisiTrend/Plot, and VisiTutor. It competed against EasyWriter and Volkswriter. This software runs under DOS 1.x and DOS 2.x. A follow up update to VisiWord offered better integration with VisiSpell. a GUI based environment. But that did not catch on. The similarly named Visi On Word word processor is not directly related to VisiWord.


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Volkswriter, from Lifetree Software Inc, was an early easy to use word processor for the IBM PC. Development of Volkswriter was inspired by the horridness of EasyWriter, and for a brief time it was possibly the only usable word processor for the IBM PC before an IBM version of WordStar was released. The "Deluxe" version will work with larger documents and has more features.


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VP Planner is a Lotus 123-type spreadsheet, but featuring 3-D (paged) spreadsheets and other advances over Lotus 123. This was the subject of a lawsuit, also involving The Twin, and Borland Quattro Pro, which Paperback Software eventually won, but which sank the company.


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First released in 1989, Wingz was a highly promoted cross platform spreadsheet available for Macintosh, Microsoft Windows, OS/2, NeXTSTEP, and Unix. At the time, it had a number of advantages over Microsoft Excel and others. It featured spreadsheets up to 32768 cells in both directions, in-cell editing, a powerful graphing system, and a macro-programming language called HyperScript. important features. Although the 1.1 updated corrected much of this, it hurt the products sales and acceptance.


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Palantir WinText is an executive level word processor for Microsoft Windows. Its primary claim to fame: it was advertised as the first word processor for Windows other than Write. same time, either overlapped or tiled. It features the ability to embed graphics, includes a spell checker (but not in the demo) and hyphenator, handles files of indefinite length, includes mail merge, boilerplates, multilevel undo, page preview, and document import file converters. most other Windows programs via the Windows Clipboard, and supports all printers supported by Windows. overhead of Microsoft Windows, as well as requiring a mouse for some operations rather than the keyboard. It was also priced rather high for functionally comparable word processors. applications in summer 1987. It is a little unclear exactly when they started shipping but it was among the earlier commercial Windows word processors, if not the first. processor, was released around that time (late 87 or early 88), and Samna Ami 1.0 shortly after. Microsoft Word 1.0 for Windows was not released until November 1989. telecommunication , "WinLook" image manager, "WinPaint" paint program, and "WinFonts".font editor.


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Timeworks Word Writer PC is a budget word processor for IBM PC and compatibles. There were versions of Word Writer for other platforms, including the Commodore 64. Word Writer was also bundled with Timeworks Office.


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During the late 1980's, WordPerfect was THE standard word processor for DOS based PCs in big business. Under DOS, it competed mostly against Wordstar. WordPerfect for Windows enjoyed some success in the early Windows environments, but was quickly displaced by Microsoft Word for Windows. Later Windows versions were part of Borland Office/Novell PerfectOffice/Corel Office/Corel WordPerfect Office.


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WordPerfect Executive is a stripped down version of the WordPerfect word processor optimized for use on 3.5" floppy-only laptops. Also includes a spreadsheet, calendar, calculator, card file, and telephone list.


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WordPerfect Works was an all-in-one integrated office productivity package that included a word processor, spreadsheet, drawing program, database, and a communications program. Initially it was just for DOS, but later there was a version for Microsoft Windows. Corporation's smaller lightweight programs. This included LetterPerfect, a scaled down DrawPerfect, PlanPerfect, and the WordPerfect Executive shell. The database was based around the Mailmerge system.


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Words and Figures is a Lotus 1-2-3 1A compatible spreadsheet clone that includes a word processor. Its primary feature is that it can share "live" data between an open spreadsheet and a document. A document and spreadsheet may be edited and viewed at the same time. Pressing F12 (or Alt-F10 on an XT keyboard) will switch between the word processor and spreadsheet. The absence of copy protection was used as a selling point.


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WordStar, originally from MicroPro, was a popular word processor during the early 80s. It was ported to a number of CP/M architectures as well as Unix and PC/MS-DOS. It competed directly against many word processors, including WordPerfect, Microsoft Word for DOS, and Multimate. By the late 80s most business word processing had moved to WordPerfect. In the early 90s, Microsoft Word for Windows took over.