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VisiWord is a solid and well designed word processor for the IBM PC from VisiCorp. It was part of VisiCorp's integrated office application suite that also included VisiCalc, VisiFile, VisiSpell, VisiTrend/Plot, and VisiTutor. It competed against EasyWriter and Volkswriter. This software runs under DOS 1.x and DOS 2.x. A follow up update to VisiWord offered better integration with VisiSpell. a GUI based environment. But that did not catch on. The similarly named Visi On Word word processor is not directly related to VisiWord.


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Vistapro is a three-dimensional landscape simulation program. Using U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) files, Vistapro can accurately recreate real world landscapes in vivid detail. It can also create fractal based landscapes, and provides many customizations. Vistapro originated on the Amiga and also had a Macintosh port.


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Volkswriter, from Lifetree Software Inc, was an early easy to use word processor for the IBM PC. Development of Volkswriter was inspired by the horridness of EasyWriter, and for a brief time it was possibly the only usable word processor for the IBM PC before an IBM version of WordStar was released. The "Deluxe" version will work with larger documents and has more features.


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VP-Expert, from Paperback Software, was a low-cost expert system solution that competed against products such as 1st-Class Fusion, Knowledgepro, Level 5, and Personal Consultant Easy. It provides rule induction, traditional structured rule programming, backwards and forward chaining, and hypertext and mouse support in graphics mode.


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VP-Info, from Paperback Software's VP Info, is a dBase-type relational database manager with compiler from the 1980s. VP-Info features the ability to use common dBase/Clipper file formats with an unlimited number of records, and a built-in compiler.


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Wang Freestyle is an "annotation" program that operates by making screen shots of DOS applications, to which the user may then add hand-written notes using a stylus or add a voice recording with a telephone-like handset. It features a Macintosh-like desktop that displays the annotated documents graphically on a proprietary high resolution monitor, and integrates a form of mail and fax.


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WillMaker is a program that takes a set of simple human-understandable questions to produce the complex legal language and law considerations, required for a modern will.


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Timeworks Word Writer PC is a budget word processor for IBM PC and compatibles. There were versions of Word Writer for other platforms, including the Commodore 64. Word Writer was also bundled with Timeworks Office.


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During the late 1980's, WordPerfect was THE standard word processor for DOS based PCs in big business. Under DOS, it competed mostly against Wordstar. WordPerfect for Windows enjoyed some success in the early Windows environments, but was quickly displaced by Microsoft Word for Windows. Later Windows versions were part of Borland Office/Novell PerfectOffice/Corel Office/Corel WordPerfect Office.


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WordPerfect Executive is a stripped down version of the WordPerfect word processor optimized for use on 3.5" floppy-only laptops. Also includes a spreadsheet, calendar, calculator, card file, and telephone list.


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WordPerfect Works was an all-in-one integrated office productivity package that included a word processor, spreadsheet, drawing program, database, and a communications program. Initially it was just for DOS, but later there was a version for Microsoft Windows. Corporation's smaller lightweight programs. This included LetterPerfect, a scaled down DrawPerfect, PlanPerfect, and the WordPerfect Executive shell. The database was based around the Mailmerge system.


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Words and Figures is a Lotus 1-2-3 1A compatible spreadsheet clone that includes a word processor. Its primary feature is that it can share "live" data between an open spreadsheet and a document. A document and spreadsheet may be edited and viewed at the same time. Pressing F12 (or Alt-F10 on an XT keyboard) will switch between the word processor and spreadsheet. The absence of copy protection was used as a selling point.


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WordStar, originally from MicroPro, was a popular word processor during the early 80s. It was ported to a number of CP/M architectures as well as Unix and PC/MS-DOS. It competed directly against many word processors, including WordPerfect, Microsoft Word for DOS, and Multimate. By the late 80s most business word processing had moved to WordPerfect. In the early 90s, Microsoft Word for Windows took over.


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WordVision was a word processor from 1983 for the IBM PC with some features unique for the time period, such as unerase, automatic document saving, and long descriptive filenames at a time when DOS did not contain that support. self booting: You booted from it to create working copies. The typical error beep was also replaced with a more pleasing "chime" sound while the program operated.


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WPS-PLUS Workstation is a word processor for VAXmate computers (286 AT computers with DEC keyboards, mice, and video). It is designed to interoperate with WPS-PLUS/VMS on VAX minicomputers.


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WriteUp is a powerful business oriented word processor designed specifically for the NEXTSTEP operating environment. It features ease of use, customizability, supports ObjectLinks that enables embedding content from other applications, document styles, headers and footer, templates, split views, a unique page navigator for longer documents, mail merge, and imports/exports many other formats.


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This is the diagnostics and GW-Basic disk bundled with Xerox 6060 IBM PC clones. these disks.


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Xerox Globalview is a desktop environment and office suite originally developed for the Xerox Star. It was developed in the MESA programming language on the Xerox Star, and ported to Sun Solaris, OS/2, and Windows 3.1 (The OS/2 version requires a MESA emulator card).


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XyWrite is a word processor for MS-DOS and Windows modeled on the mainframe-based ATEX typesetting system. Popular with writers and editors for its speed and degree of customization, XyWrite was in its heyday the house word processor in many editorial offices, including the New York Times from 1989 to 1993. XyWrite was developed by David Erickson and marketed by XyQuest from 1982 through 1992, after which it was acquired by The Technology Group. The final version for MS-DOS was 4.18 (1993); for Windows, 4.13. An offshoot descendant of XyWrite called Nota Bene is still being actively developed.