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Internet Explorer is Microsoft's venture into the Web Browser market. The initial version of Explorer was incarnated from Spyglass Mosaic which Microsoft licensed for a modest quarterly fee and a share of the non-Windows product revenues. As Microsoft decided to distribute Internet Explorer "free of charge" with their Windows operating system, they were able to avoid most royalties. This resulted in a lawsuit and a US$8 million settlement in January 1997. Being included in Windows since Windows 95 and beyond, it quickly overtook Netscape in the first Browser War and retained ~95% of market share until the early 2000's when popular alternative browsers such as Mozilla Firefox came to market sparking the 2nd browser war. Internet Explorer was long known for disobeying set web standards by the W3C until version 9 when Microsoft took a new commitment to HTML5 and web standards.


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IRIX was a operating system created by SGI (Silicon Graphics Inc) that was based off of System V Unix. In addition, this OS had additional BSD elements. It's initial release was in 1988 and was designed to on MIPS processors. IRIX machines were typically used for visual effects in the entertainment industry and in the scientific community for several years after the fall of Amiga in the early 90s.


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Lindows, later Linspire, was an attempt similar to Corel Linux to put desktop Linux in the hands of the consumer. With a customized KDE 3.x desktop, custom applications borderline cloning the Apple iLife suite, and a primitive "app store," it was intended to be easy to use and fully functional out of the box.


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Versions of the Linux Kernel from various time periods. These are mainly for reference material. Source Code Only Download


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Mandrake Linux was a highly polished and easy to use Linux distribution, originally based on Red Hat Linux with KDE. In 2005, Mandrake Linux became Mandriva.


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Although Microsoft did not invent BASIC, their founding product was a BASIC interpreter for the Altair computer. The descendants below includes Microsoft's BASIC-80 (MBASIC), BASIC-86 (pre-GWBasic), BASIC for Mac, BASIC Compiler 86/88, Basic Compiler for Mac, and Professional Development System 7.x. IBM Personal Computer Basic Compiler, GW-BASIC, QuickBasic, and Visual Basic are listed separately.


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The Microsoft Word word processor was first introduced for MS-DOS in 1983. Its design made use of a mouse and WYSIWYG graphics. Its crude WYSIWYG/mouse support was a direct response to the Apple Lisa/Mac, and VisiCorp Visi On. Initially it competed against many popular word processors such as WordStar, Multimate, and WordPerfect. Word for DOS was never really successful.


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Netscape Navigator/Communicator was the first commercial web browser, displacing the free NCSA Mosaic. 1.0 was first released in December 1994, and initially offered advanced features such as progressively rendering pages as they loaded. It quickly gained many other features and capabilities and became the most popular web browser in the mid 1990s. One reason for its popularity, it was licensed freely for personal and non-profit use, although companies were expected to pay for a license. It later competed with Microsoft Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari, and eventually was open sourced in to the Mozilla browser.


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NEWS-OS was a variant of BSD (later System version V UNIX) developed by Sony for use on their series of work stations called the Sony NEWS (Network Engineering WorkStation). This machine was a desktop replacement to VAXes in japan, created in 1987. NEWS-OS was designed specifically for use on computer networks, and had support for the TCP/IP protocol, something that wasn't commonly used back in the day but now required for today's machines. Versions 1-4 of NEWS-OS used 4.2BSD as its base. Versions 5 and 6 used UNIX System V 4.2.


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NeXTSTEP, from NeXT Computers headed by Steve Jobs, is a Unix based operating system designed to run on m68K NeXT workstations. It later became the basis for OS X, with APIs and concepts preserved today.


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Genera is a commercial operating system and integrated development environment for Lisp machines developed by Symbolics. It is essentially a fork of an earlier operating system originating on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) AI Lab's Lisp machines which Symbolics had used in common with Lisp Machines, Inc. (LMI), and Texas Instruments (TI). Genera is also sold by Symbolics as Open Genera, which runs Genera on computers based on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) Alpha processor using Tru64 UNIX. the programming language Lisp. software using a mix of programming styles with extensive support for object-oriented programming.


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PasteUp is a text processing system that can arrange columns of text, provide typographical control, draw shapes, and other effects.


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Interactive UNIX, also known as PC/IX, and 386/ix were UNIX derivitives created for the IBM PC in the early 1980's. PC/IX was the first UNIX sold directly from IBM, but not the first UNIX sold for the IBM PC. (Venix/86 was the first.) The original PC/IX software sold was on 19 floppy disks and sold for 900 dollars. In 1985, 386/ix was introduced, later named Interactive UNIX. The last version released was 4.1.1 in July 1998 and was supported up until 2006.


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Powerchute is a utility for use with American Power Conversion Corporation (APC) battery backup power supplies.


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QNX is a compact Unix-like real-time operating system that was originally designed for the IBM PC and later used in embedded devices. The versions here are for IBM PC compatibles.


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Red Hat Linux was a popular early Linux distribution, that was made available as a boxed set available in stores.


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SimCity is a strategy game in which you are the mayor of your own virtual city and you can control the aspects of it - from city planning of land use, development of infrastructure, zoning of schools, police and fire, and the problems that come with a city such as crime, education quality, etc...


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FacetTerm is a windowing interface software package for character-based Unix terminals. FacetTerm gives users pull-down menuing and multitasking ability.


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StarOffice, initially from Star Division GmbH is an office suite containing a word processor, spreadsheet, drawing program, and graphing program. It was later owned by Sun Microsystems and then Oracle, and spawned the open source OpenOffice and LibreOffice. Also see the earlier StarWriter


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Sun's Java WorkShop is a powerful, visual development tool for professional Java programmers. Java WorkShop offers a complete, easy-to-use (for bizarre masochistic definitions of easy) toolset for building JavaBeans, Java applets and applications faster and easier than ever before.


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Solaris is a Unix based operating system created by Sun Microsystems (now purchased by Oracle in 2010). It is the successor to SunOS and was released initially in June of 1992. The OS is based off of System V Unix and its first release was known internally as SunOS 5. This OS was typically used on SPARC based processors, up until 1994 when it began to support x86 and x86-64 based machines. Versions of Solaris up until version 8 are considered abandoned, with version 9's support ending in October 2014.


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SunOS was a UNIX based OS derived from BSD. Initially released in 1982, it was the standard OS on Sun Machines at that time. Platforms supported by this OS were the Motorola 68000, the Sun 386i, and the SPARC. SunOS machines are still actually in use today powering dams and bread factories.


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This is the software required to operate a SunPC co-processor card under Solaris. The SunPC provides Sparc users with IBM PC compatibility and the ability to use MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows 95 within Solaris.


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Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise 11.9.2 for Solaris Released in 1998 by Sybase For Solaris Server, is a powerful relational database primarily used on Unix systems. OS/2.


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Tru64, formerly Digital UNIX, formerly OSF/1 was DEC's UNIX product for their line of Alpha based systems. After DEC's acquisition by Compaq, it was renamed to Tru64. DEC previously had sold a BSD derivative named Ultrix for Vax and MIPS based systems. Their new UNIX on Alpha was meant to counter AT&T and Sun's SVR4 Unix. Tru64 / DIGITAL UNIX / OSF/1 is somewhat interesting in that it used portions of the Mach microkernel and BSD kernel and userland in a manner not entirely unlike NeXTSTEP or Mac OS X. Like OS X, Tru64 itself is not a microkernel system but uses Mach code in its kernel to implement threading and scheduling and possibly other features.